emergencies

What if my child has a toothache?

What if my child has a toothache?

Clean the area around the sore tooth thoroughly. Rinse the mouth with warm salt water or use dental floss to dislodge impacted food or debris. For temporary pain relief,  ibuprofen is recommended.  In the event of facial swelling, you can apply a cold compress to the area and contact our office as soon as possible.

What should be done about a cut or bitten tongue, lip, or cheek?

What should be done about a cut or bitten tongue, lip, or cheek?

Apply ice to bruised areas.  If there is bleeding, apply firm pressure with a clean gauze or cloth. If bleeding does not stop after 15 minutes or it cannot be controlled by simple pressure, contact our office or seek emergency care.

What if a tooth is chipped or fractured?

What if a tooth is chipped or fractured?

Rinse debris from the injured area with warm water. Put a cold compress over the facial area of injury. Locate and save any tooth fragments in milk, trying to avoid handling fragments as much as possible.  If your child experiences severe pain, contact our office as soon as possible.

What should I do if my child has knocked out a BABY tooth?

What should I do if my child has knocked out a BABY tooth?

Contact our office as soon as possible.  We do not re-implant baby teeth but it is important to examine your child to be sure no fragments of tooth are embedded in the gums, lip or tongue, as well as determine the extent of trauma to other teeth in the area.  Bring along the knocked out tooth.

What shoud I do if my child has knocked out a PERMANENT tooth?

What shoud I do if my child has knocked out a PERMANENT tooth?

Time is of the essence in this situation. Find the tooth.  Handle the tooth by the crown, not the root portion. You may rinse the tooth, but DO NOT wipe or handle the tooth any more than absolutely necessary. Inspect the tooth for fractures. If there are no fractures, try to reinsert it into the socket. Have the patient hold the tooth in place by biting on a gauze. If you cannot reinsert the tooth, transport the tooth in a cup of milk or in a cup containing the patient's own saliva. DO NOT place the tooth in water. Call our office immediately or go to the nearest emergency room.   

What if my child sustains a really bad blow to the chin?

What if my child sustains a really bad blow to the chin?

In the event of a severe blow to the chin, or any jaw injury, tie the mouth closed with a towel, tie or handkerchief tied around the patients head, supporting the chin. In such a situation it is important to rule out a jaw fracture. Go immediately to an emergency room.

What should I do if my child has an orthodontic emergency?

What should I do if my child has an orthodontic emergency?

While orthodontic emergencies are not common, they do happen occasionally.  Fortunately, you can temporarily solve many problems yourself by following some of the simple guidelines below.  However, when you are experiencing severe pain or discomfort, please give our office a call so we can see you promptly.

Poking Wire?

Poking Wire?

Using a pencil eraser, push the poking wire down or place wax on it to alleviate the discomfort.

Loose bracket or band?

Loose bracket or band?

If your bracket or band is still attached to the wire, you should leave it in place and put wax on it. If the bracket comes off, bring it in on your next appointment so we can determine why it came off.

Loose wire?

Loose wire?

Using tweezers, try to place your wire back into place. If doing this and using wax does not help, as a last resort use a small fingernail clipper that has been washed and sterilized in alcohol to clip the wire behind the last tooth to which it is securely fastened.  If your discomfort continues, place wax on it, and call our office for an appointment.

Lost separators?

Lost separators?

Most patients lose a separator during their treatment. Do not worry about losing a separator, but call our office to see if it needs to be replaced.

General soreness?

General soreness?

During the first week after your braces are in place and routine adjustments are complete, you will likely feel some pain, soreness or discomfort.  Your teeth may be tender to biting pressures for three to five days.  You may take acetaminophen or other non-aspirin pain relievers while you adjust to your new braces. A warm wash cloth or heating pad may reduce the soreness in your jaws.

The lips, cheeks and tongue may also become irritated for one to two weeks as they toughen and become accustomed to the surface of the braces. You can put wax on the braces to lessen this.